This master bath had a few likeable options. Heated tile floors, done by Gabriel tile, Moen U connect faucet that runs via your phone app, double vanity, extra outlet on the right side, humidity sensing fan to eliminate mold and mildew build up. Paint by Father & Son Painting, electrical was LED and done by Heimlich Electric. All plumbing fixtures were Moen, toilet by Kohler.
How to DIY it: Take off the loose bar by removing the screws on each of the posts that mount the bar to the wall. (If one side is solidly attached, leave it alone.) With the mounting plate now exposed, try tightening 
the screws in it. If that doesn’t work, remove it. Chances are you’ll find two plastic anchors underneath. Poke them with 
a screwdriver and let them fall inside the wall. Replace with bigger, stronger metal toggle 
anchors (above), sold at hardware stores. Just drive them into the existing holes with a drill 
or a screwdriver, and then re­attach everything.

Anyone you hire to work in or around your home should have two types of insurance: general liability and worker’s compensation. General liability covers damages if, for example, a ladder smashes through your (or your neighbor’s) window. Worker’s comp covers injuries if a worker falls off a ladder. If the company doesn’t have these coverages, you could be stuck paying claims.


The term handyman increasingly describes a paid worker, but it also includes non-paid homeowners or do-it-yourselfers. Tasks range from minor to major, from unskilled to highly skilled, and include painting, drywall repair, remodeling, minor plumbing work, minor electrical work, household carpentry, sheetrock, crown moulding, and furniture assembly (see more complete list below.) The term handyman is occasionally applied as an adjective to describe politicians or business leaders who make substantial organizational changes, such as overhauling a business structure or administrative division.[6][7]
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